The Architects

The Architects

Mall Man: Victor Gruen

Architect of an American Icon

The man universally credited with pioneering the modern shopping mall is Victor Gruen, an Austrian immigrant to the United States.

Photo of a Richard Neutra Building

Richard Neutra

Buildings are the Anchors of the Soul

On August 15, 1949 the face of world-renowned Austrian-American architect Richard Neutra adorned the cover of TIME Magazine. As unusual it may seem for us today that the famous magazine would choose an architect on its cover, Neutra at the time was at the peak of his success. He had been designing houses in the U.S. for about 20 years, leaving his architectural mark in the Los Angeles area.

 

Rudolph Schindler

"As if there had never been houses before"

Rudolph Michael Schindler was born into a Jewish Viennese family in 1887. A contemporary and life-long friend of Richard Neutra, he also moved to Los Angeles via Chicago, where he worked with Frank Lloyd Wright. A radical modernist, his work was only later admired for its inventiveness and character.

Rudolph Schindler. Photo: MAK Center

Elisabeth Scheu-Close

Elizabeth Scheu Close (1912-2011) was born in Vienna in 1912 and grew up in a villa designed by famed Austrian Architect Adolf Loos. She would eventually become the foremost female architect of Minnesota, leaving a substantial mark on the state’s built environment. With her husband, Winston Close, she founded Minnesota’s first modernist architecture firm and designed a number of notable public and private buildings in the state.

Friedrich St. Florian

Friedrich St. Florian, a practicing architect since 1974, is best known as the architect of The National World War II Memorial in Washington, DC. The World War II Memorial honors the 16 million who served in the armed forces of the U.S., the more than 400,000 who died, and all who supported the war effort from home. Symbolic of the defining event of the 20th Century, the memorial is a monument to the spirit, sacrifice, and commitment of the American people. The Second World War is the only 20th Century event commemorated on the National Mall’s central axis.

  Friedrich St. Florian, a fellow at the MIT Center for Advanced Visual Studies, 1971-1977.  Photo: Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Friedrich St. Florian, a fellow at the MIT Center for Advanced Visual Studies, 1971-1977. Photo: Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Frederick John Kiesler

Frederick John Kiesler, born in Czernowitz, Austria-Hungary (in today's Ukraine), received his education at the Technische Hochschule and the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna. He and his wife moved to New York City in 1926, who has been active in theater and exhibit design, he produced a respected body of work in architecture, sculpture, and also in drawing and painting. Kiesler wrote extensively and made substantial contributions to the theory of architecture. Among these works are Pseudo-Functionalism in Modern Architecture and Contemporary Art Applied to the Store and Its Display.

In 1952, he was named one of the 15 leading artists at mid-century by the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Left: Frederick John Kiesler at the 'Internationale Ausstellung neuer Theatertechnik' in Vienna, 1924.

Photo: Wikimedia

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